Never too late to start exercising

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Health and fitness is exactly like saving for your retirement. When you're young you think there's plenty of time later on to take care of it, but by the time you realise you have to start saving hard, you've left it too late to reap significant long-term rewards. That's not to say it's not worth starting if you're in your 40's, 50's or 60's, but if you're starting out never having exercised before, at that point you have to work that much harder to have a good sized 'health nest egg' when you need it.

According to NZ stats the average lifespan of Kiwi men and women is now mid 80"s. This is about 7 years longer than it was 30 years ago - probably due in large part to improved medicines rather than us actually looking after ourselves better.

A healthy lifestyle is not one that you turn off and on, do in spurts, over an 11 day liver cleanse, or maintain for a whole month while swearing off alcohol. This approach is just fooling yourself that any of these 'short and sweet' attempts will make any long-term difference at all.

old-women-exercisesBy starting a fitness regime as early as possible you'll set yourself up for real health benefits later in life.

A bit like the financial savings idea, it can be hard to think 30-40 yrs ahead and consider the life you'll one day have. What state of health you'll be in. Which of your friends will still be alive, or even which of your friends and family will still be active enough that you can go and play those old classics, golf and lawn bowls. Sad to think you might not even make the lawn bowls team.

If you're already in the 'golden years' age bracket it's never too late to start exercising. Just expect to work a little harder for your results. But a little hard work never hurt anybody, and the benefits of increased bone density, cardiovascular health, and balance and coordination are all the more important to keeping your body healthy later in life.

We can help you make a start towards your long-term health goals, now. The first step is here.